Book Report Information

Your child is expected to complete 2 book reports throughout the school year, The due dates and topics for these reports are as follows:

Due 5/10: ANY Nonfiction book (historical, sports, animals, country, etc.)


Due 6/13: ANY Fiction book (fantasy, folktale, realistic fiction, etc.)


Book reports are to be completed at home.

The report MUST include the following 2 components:
1. Book Report worksheet
2. Self-created poster, skit, diorama, or any other inventive way to share the book's details with classmates. Please read the list below for all of the options.
**All reports will be presented in class. Grades will be based on completion, neatness, and effort (bonus points for creativity). Have fun and enjoy those books! Your Reading EFFORT grade will be based on your report.

Book Report Options
1. BOARD GAME
A. Create a board game using the characters and setting from the story you read.
B. Use buttons or other small items for the markers.
C. Use a spinner or dice for the number of spaces the pieces move.
D. Draw the board on heavy paper. Make the pieces move through places or events from the story.
E. You may need to make up question and answer cards to go with the game.
F. Include a set of rules, the game board, and the game pieces in a baggie. Be sure your name and the name of the game are on the board and on the baggie.
G. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



2. SHOE BOX DIORAMA
A. Trace the bottom of a shoe box on a plain piece of paper. Cut out the shape. Make sure it fits into the bottom of the shoe box. Draw and color the background or setting of the scene on this paper. Glue it in the shoebox.
B. Draw, color, and cut out characters. Attach L-shaped strips of heavy paper to the back of each character. Glue each character to the bottom of the box. Do this for any other props you would like to add to make your scene realistic.
C. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



3. LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION!
A. Choose an event from your book that would be fun and interesting to act out. If more than one character appears in the scene, have classmates who have read the same book take the other parts.
B. Dress up and use props to act out the action of the story. Practice several times so everyone knows what to do. You may use cards to help you remember your parts.
C. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



4. HANGING MOBILE
A. On a sheet of paper, brainstorm a list of the most important(1.) characters in your book, (2.) the settings, and (3.) any special objects that were part of the story. For instance, in "Charlotte's Web", Fern, Wilbur, and Charlotte are important characters. The Arable's barn and the County Fair are settings. Objects that are important are Wilbur's crate and the words Charlotte writes.
B. After listing all the possible characters, settings, and objects you can think of, decide which ones best represent your book. Choose5-7 to illustrate, drawing both the front and back views. Your items should be colored on both sides. Make them medium size, not too small and not too large... just right.
C. Hang the items from pieces of yarn or string on a hanger.
D. Add a card with the book title, author and your name.
E. Once you have tied the pieces to the mobile and have each piece balanced, place a drop of glue on the string so it doesn't slip on the hanger.
F. Carry your mobile to school in a trash bag or other large bag. Paper clip the card parts together so they don't tangle. We will hang it when you get to class.
G. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



5. MYSTERY PERSON: Who Am I?
A. This project is good for a biography or a book that nearly everyone in the class knows.
B. Choose a character from your book that is well-known to your classmates.
C. Write ten clues about your well-known mystery person on index
cards. Your clues should summarize the person's whole life.
D. When you present your mystery person, you can dress up and act out clues OR read the clues that tell us about your past and who you are.
E. Your classmates will make guesses about who you are so please make sure you give clues about you and your life.



6. BOOK JACKET
A. For this project use a 12' X 18" piece of construction paper.
B. Fold the paper in half. Then fold each end of the paper in 3 1/2 inches to make the inside flaps of the book jacket.
C. On the front cover, write the title and the author of your book. Draw and color a picture that is appropriate for your book. Book Jacket by:
D. On the front inside flap, write a summary of the story in your own words. Include what kind of book this is, who the main characters are, the setting, and the main events of the story.
E. On the back inside flap, write a short paragraph about the author. You should include where the author lives, the author's interests, and other good books written by this author.
F. On the back cover, write a short blurb that will catch a reader's attention.
G. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



7. TV COMMERCIAL
A. Decide what the best thing is about your book.
B. Write a commercial promoting your book. Be sure to tell why this book is such a good selection, but don't give away the ending. The commercial should not last more than a minute. You can have up to three other people in your commercial with you.
C. Turn in your script with the title of the book, the author, and your name on it.
D. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



8. CLAY MODELS
A. Choose at least two figures or objects that represent your book to make out of clay.
B. You may use any kind of clay- modeling clay or flour and salt play-doh. You can color the clay or paint the figures after they dry.
C. On a 4" X 6" card, write the title of the book (underlined)on the top line. On the next line, write the author's name. Skip a line. Write a paragraph telling about the figure you made. Tell something that happened to this figure in the story you read.
D. Write your name at the bottom of the card. It will be on display with your project.
E. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



9. TEN IMPORTANT QUESTIONS
A. Write ten questions you think anyone who reads your book should be able to answer. They can be true/false, multiple choice, or short answer questions that require some writing. Your questions should be from the beginning, middle, and end of the book. Remember to use what, where, how, when, who, and why in your questions.
B. Write the title of your book at the top of your question page.
C. Put the answers on another sheet of paper.
D. Make sure your name and book title are on both sheets.
E. This project can be typed or written.
F. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



10. IT'S ALL ABOUT ME
A. Gather 7 to 10 items that the main character might put in a "Me Bag".
B. Before you put the items in a bag, decorate the bag with the title of the book, the author's name, and your name. Draw pictures or designs that relate to the story.
C. Introduce the main character of the book to the class by explaining why that character would choose each of the items in the bag.
D. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



11. WORD SEARCH
A. Find 20 key words or new vocabulary words from your book.
B. Make a word search with the words in it.
C. Make a word list to go with the word search.
D. Make an answer sheet with the 20 words highlighted.
E. Turn in a word list, a word search, an answer sheet. Make sure your name and the title of your book is on everything you turn in.
F. Be prepared to give an oral summary of the book. Be familiar with the characters, setting, problem and solution.



Book Genres
Mystery: The characters are usually fictional but they behave in realistic ways. There is a problem that needs to be solved. A mystery may have a detective or a spy as a main character. Clues are used by characters to find a solution to the mystery.


Biographies: A biography is a book of true stories about the life of a real person. The author is a different person than the book is written about. The person in the biography can be dead or alive. The author describe show the person affected others.


Fantasy: A fantasy is a fictional story where there is a struggle between good and evil, and often involves magic. The characters or objects do things that couldn't happen in real life. Creatures may be in the story that don't exist in life.


Realistic Fiction: The characters in these stories behave in realistic ways.
Historical Fiction: Some characters may be real and others are fictional. The story takes place during a period in history. Real events from history are mixed with fictional events.


Nonfiction: Nonfiction books provide true facts and information about different subjects.


Fairy Tales: The characters in fairy tales are make believe. Fairytales may involve magic. They often begin with "Once upon a time" and end with "they lived happily ever after."